Acclaimed English violinist Thomas Bowes seems to have a penchant for thoroughness and completion. Known and praised for his complete recording of all J. S. Bach's sonatas and partitas, the European virtuoso has now taken it upon himself to embark on another quest for totality. This time, it is the six sonatas by Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe (1858-1931), presented on Bowes' new album, EUGENE YSAYE: SIX SONATAS FOR SOLO VIOLIN. As one would expect from Bowes, they are played to passionate perfection. Ysaÿe, hailed in his time as no less than the "King of the Violin", is a formidable figure to take on for any modern musician. He was famed not only for precision but more especially for a deeply affecting, quasi-supernatural power of communication. A man of immense generosity and largeness of spirit It is difficult to imagine any violinist adequately reproducing Ysaÿe's compositions and this special aura. Doubly so if one considers the background of the Six Sonatas for Violin. They were written at a crucial point late in life. Plagued by illness and doubt and finding himself increasingly cut off from playing his beloved instrument as he would wish, this deep frustration found expression in this encapsulation of his art. In short, these works - all sketched out at white heat in a 24-hour period and hair-raisingly complex and difficult for the player - are an embodiment of the man. Thankfully, Bowes not only possesses the technical mastery to command every playing requirement; he also approaches these works with a great sense of empathy towards their creator. It is this attribute which affords him the rarest of insights into Ysaÿe's violinistic mastermind. In fact, Bowes plays with such zest and clarity that the listener occasionally needs to be reminded that these are indeed sonatas for solo violin, not for an ensemble of two or three musicians.
Acclaimed English violinist Thomas Bowes seems to have a penchant for thoroughness and completion. Known and praised for his complete recording of all J. S. Bach's sonatas and partitas, the European virtuoso has now taken it upon himself to embark on another quest for totality. This time, it is the six sonatas by Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe (1858-1931), presented on Bowes' new album, EUGENE YSAYE: SIX SONATAS FOR SOLO VIOLIN. As one would expect from Bowes, they are played to passionate perfection. Ysaÿe, hailed in his time as no less than the "King of the Violin", is a formidable figure to take on for any modern musician. He was famed not only for precision but more especially for a deeply affecting, quasi-supernatural power of communication. A man of immense generosity and largeness of spirit It is difficult to imagine any violinist adequately reproducing Ysaÿe's compositions and this special aura. Doubly so if one considers the background of the Six Sonatas for Violin. They were written at a crucial point late in life. Plagued by illness and doubt and finding himself increasingly cut off from playing his beloved instrument as he would wish, this deep frustration found expression in this encapsulation of his art. In short, these works - all sketched out at white heat in a 24-hour period and hair-raisingly complex and difficult for the player - are an embodiment of the man. Thankfully, Bowes not only possesses the technical mastery to command every playing requirement; he also approaches these works with a great sense of empathy towards their creator. It is this attribute which affords him the rarest of insights into Ysaÿe's violinistic mastermind. In fact, Bowes plays with such zest and clarity that the listener occasionally needs to be reminded that these are indeed sonatas for solo violin, not for an ensemble of two or three musicians.
896931005814

Details

Format: CD
Label: NAVONA
Rel. Date: 04/10/2020
UPC: 896931005814

6 Sonatas For Solo Violin
Artist: Thomas Bowes
Format: CD
New: Available 14.99
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DISC: 1

1. Violin Sonata In E Major, Op. 27 No. 6 "Manuel Quiroga"
2. Violin Sonata In G Minor, Op. 27 No. 1 "Joseph Szigeti": I. Grave. Lento Assai
3. Violin Sonata In G Minor, Op. 27 No. 1 "Joseph Szigeti": II. Fugato. Molto Moderato
4. Violin Sonata In G Minor, Op. 27 No. 1 "Joseph Szigeti": III. Allegretto Poco Scherzoso. Amabile
5. Violin Sonata In G Minor, Op. 27 No. 1 "Joseph Szigeti": IV. Finale Con Brio. Allegra Fermo
6. Violin Sonata In E Minor, Op. 27 No. 4 "Fritz Kreisler": I. Allemanda. Lento Maestoso
7. Violin Sonata In E Minor, Op. 27 No. 4 "Fritz Kreisler": II. Sarabande. Quasi Lento
8. Violin Sonata In E Minor, Op. 27 No. 4 "Fritz Kreisler": III. Finale. Presto Ma Non Troppo
9. Violin In G Minor, Op. 27 No. 3 "Ballade"
10. Violin Sonata In A Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 "Obsession": I. Prélude, Poco Vivace
11. Violin Sonata In A Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 "Obsession": II. Malinconia. Poco Lento
12. Violin Sonata In A Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 "Obsession": III. Danse Des Ombres Arabande
13. Violin Sonata In A Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 "Obsession": IV. Les Furies. Allegro Furioso
14. Violin Sonata In G Major, Op. 27 No. 5 "Mathieu Crickboom": I. L'aurore. Lento Assai
15. Violin Sonata In G Major, Op. 27 No. 5 "Mathieu Crickboom": II. Rustique. Allegro Giocoso Molto Moderato

More Info:

Acclaimed English violinist Thomas Bowes seems to have a penchant for thoroughness and completion. Known and praised for his complete recording of all J. S. Bach's sonatas and partitas, the European virtuoso has now taken it upon himself to embark on another quest for totality. This time, it is the six sonatas by Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe (1858-1931), presented on Bowes' new album, EUGENE YSAYE: SIX SONATAS FOR SOLO VIOLIN. As one would expect from Bowes, they are played to passionate perfection. Ysaÿe, hailed in his time as no less than the "King of the Violin", is a formidable figure to take on for any modern musician. He was famed not only for precision but more especially for a deeply affecting, quasi-supernatural power of communication. A man of immense generosity and largeness of spirit It is difficult to imagine any violinist adequately reproducing Ysaÿe's compositions and this special aura. Doubly so if one considers the background of the Six Sonatas for Violin. They were written at a crucial point late in life. Plagued by illness and doubt and finding himself increasingly cut off from playing his beloved instrument as he would wish, this deep frustration found expression in this encapsulation of his art. In short, these works - all sketched out at white heat in a 24-hour period and hair-raisingly complex and difficult for the player - are an embodiment of the man. Thankfully, Bowes not only possesses the technical mastery to command every playing requirement; he also approaches these works with a great sense of empathy towards their creator. It is this attribute which affords him the rarest of insights into Ysaÿe's violinistic mastermind. In fact, Bowes plays with such zest and clarity that the listener occasionally needs to be reminded that these are indeed sonatas for solo violin, not for an ensemble of two or three musicians.